The Glutamate Association Articles from The Glutamate Association. http://www.msgfacts.com MSG Facts from A to Umamihttp://www.msgfacts.com/news/msg-facts-from-a-to-umamiMon, 17 Aug 2015 00:00:00 +0000MSG FACTSThe International Food Information Council Foundation (IFIC) has published a fact sheet Monosodium Glutamate (MSG): From A to Umami

The fact sheet, which has been favorably reviewed by the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, can be downloaded here.

These are IFIC's Fast Facts about MSG:


1

A natural fermentation process is used to produce MSG.

2

MSG is simply sodium and glutamate.

3

MSG contains just one-third the amount of sodium of table salt.

4

Glutamate and MSG are gluten-free.

5

MSG is safe to consume, according to scientific research and regulatory authorities around the world, including the FDA.

6

The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology is clear that MSG is not an allergen.

7

There is no scientific evidence the "MSG sensitivity" exists. Some individuals have reported symptoms (similar to symptoms of a food allergy) after consuming MSG, but no scientific research has been able to show that consuming MSG causes these symptoms.


Of course the reason that we can be confident that this is the case is that glutamate occurs widely in many of the foods we eat every day.

For more facts about MSG and Umami seasoning click here


]]>
The International Food Information Council Foundation (IFIC) has published a fact sheet Monosodium Glutamate (MSG): From A to Umami

The fact sheet, which has been favorably reviewed by the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, can be downloaded here.

These are IFIC's Fast Facts about MSG:


1

A natural fermentation process is used to produce MSG.

2

MSG is simply sodium and glutamate.

3

MSG contains just one-third the amount of sodium of table salt.

4

Glutamate and MSG are gluten-free.

5

MSG is safe to consume, according to scientific research and regulatory authorities around the world, including the FDA.

6

The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology is clear that MSG is not an allergen.

7

There is no scientific evidence the "MSG sensitivity" exists. Some individuals have reported symptoms (similar to symptoms of a food allergy) after consuming MSG, but no scientific research has been able to show that consuming MSG causes these symptoms.


Of course the reason that we can be confident that this is the case is that glutamate occurs widely in many of the foods we eat every day.

For more facts about MSG and Umami seasoning click here


]]>
Recipes seasoned with MSG-based flavor enhancers keep you fuller longer!http://www.msgfacts.com/news/recipes-seasoned-with-msg-based-flavor-enhancers-keep-you-fuller-longerFri, 01 Aug 2014 00:00:00 +0000MSG FACTS Researchers at the University of Sussex in the United Kingdom, have demonstrated that umami seasoning - a combination of monosodium glutamate (MSG) and inosine 5' monophosphate (IMP) - not only made their test dish (soup) more tasty and appetizing but also increased satiety so that energy intake at the following meal was reduced.

In the study1 published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the researchers stated that "The results implied a bi-phasic effect of MSG/IMP on appetite, with umami flavor stimulating hunger because of increased palatability but subsequently acting to enhance satiety".

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has been used, as culinary seasoning, for more than a century to increase the savory umami taste of food. It is known to act synergistically with IMP to further increase umami deliciousness. Recipes high in umami taste are generally rated as tastier and more pleasant than their lower salt or 'no MSG' counterparts.

The authors of this ground-breaking study state in their conclusions "To our knowledge, this is the first study to report a biphasic action of MSG/IMP and implies that increased liking at one eating occasion can lead to better regulation at the next eating occasion".

For more information about MSG and Umami click here.

1. Masic U & Yeomans MR, Umami flavor enhances appetite but also increases satiety AJCN 2014; 100:532-8

]]>
Researchers at the University of Sussex in the United Kingdom, have demonstrated that umami seasoning - a combination of monosodium glutamate (MSG) and inosine 5' monophosphate (IMP) - not only made their test dish (soup) more tasty and appetizing but also increased satiety so that energy intake at the following meal was reduced.

In the study1 published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the researchers stated that "The results implied a bi-phasic effect of MSG/IMP on appetite, with umami flavor stimulating hunger because of increased palatability but subsequently acting to enhance satiety".

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has been used, as culinary seasoning, for more than a century to increase the savory umami taste of food. It is known to act synergistically with IMP to further increase umami deliciousness. Recipes high in umami taste are generally rated as tastier and more pleasant than their lower salt or 'no MSG' counterparts.

The authors of this ground-breaking study state in their conclusions "To our knowledge, this is the first study to report a biphasic action of MSG/IMP and implies that increased liking at one eating occasion can lead to better regulation at the next eating occasion".

For more information about MSG and Umami click here.

1. Masic U & Yeomans MR, Umami flavor enhances appetite but also increases satiety AJCN 2014; 100:532-8

]]>
MSG is the best option for reducing sodium - without turning people 'off'!http://www.msgfacts.com/news/msg-is-the-best-option-for-reducing-sodium---without-turning-people-offWed, 28 May 2014 00:00:00 +0000MSG FACTS A recent study1, on the role herbs and spices could play in enhancing consumer liking of low salt soup, shows how difficult is the task of reformulating established products. As with other studies of this nature, the results show that reducing the salt levels (in a tomato soup) leads to an immediate decline in consumer liking for the soup. The study showed that even with careful selection of herbs and spices, to increase the seasoning and perceived saltiness, it took repeated consumption of the reformulated 'new' soup to increase people's taste for it. The unseasoned, low salt variant did not become liked even after repeated tastings.

In contrast, seasoning with MSG (monosodium glutamate) can facilitate formulation with significantly lower sodium levels, while not reducing the palatability and pleasantness of the soup. And for those who fret about so-called clean labeling (or using chemicals or artificial additives) in their food - they will be pleased to learn that the glutamate in the seasoning is exactly the same as that in tomatoes; and that MSG seasoning has just 40% of the sodium in an equivalent amount of table salt.

There are some very tasty recipes on our MSGDish blog.

 

1. Ghawi, Rowland & Methven: Enhancing consumer liking of low salt tomato soup over repeated exposure by herb and spice seasonings. Appetite 81, 20-29, 2014

]]>
A recent study1, on the role herbs and spices could play in enhancing consumer liking of low salt soup, shows how difficult is the task of reformulating established products. As with other studies of this nature, the results show that reducing the salt levels (in a tomato soup) leads to an immediate decline in consumer liking for the soup. The study showed that even with careful selection of herbs and spices, to increase the seasoning and perceived saltiness, it took repeated consumption of the reformulated 'new' soup to increase people's taste for it. The unseasoned, low salt variant did not become liked even after repeated tastings.

In contrast, seasoning with MSG (monosodium glutamate) can facilitate formulation with significantly lower sodium levels, while not reducing the palatability and pleasantness of the soup. And for those who fret about so-called clean labeling (or using chemicals or artificial additives) in their food - they will be pleased to learn that the glutamate in the seasoning is exactly the same as that in tomatoes; and that MSG seasoning has just 40% of the sodium in an equivalent amount of table salt.

There are some very tasty recipes on our MSGDish blog.

 

1. Ghawi, Rowland & Methven: Enhancing consumer liking of low salt tomato soup over repeated exposure by herb and spice seasonings. Appetite 81, 20-29, 2014

]]>